Roll out Program on Child Protection and Youth Participation

Roll out Program on Child Protection and Youth Participation
Worldwide, before 18th Century, Children were not considered as having a full human value, in other words, the characteristics of this special period that we call “childhood” were not recognized, neither honored. Therefore, Childhood didn’t get the necessary attention, and children were not considered as a distinct social category. In ancient civilizations, Acts of infanticide and abandonment of children were common practice. Children were strangled at birth, their bodies thrown on piles of fertilizers, rejected children were victims of murder or abandonment, disabled children who cried a lot were killed, and Females were victims of violation. In France, in the Antiquity (civilization), nobody thought to give special protection to children. In the Middle-Age, children were considered as “small adults”. Minor rights during the 18th century and 19th century, laws started to protect children during the workplace and that children needed to be educated during the 20th century. Laws protecting children in the social, medical and judicial fields were put in place. This kind of protection started first in France and spread across Europe afterwards. Since 1919, the international community, following the creation of The League of Nations (now known as the UN), started to give some kind of importance to that concept and elaborates a Committee for child protection.
As quoted by Her Majesty Gyalyum Sangay Choden Wangchuck. “I have always believed that children are god’s precious gift to parents. They represent the future of the nation and also the wealth and resource of a country’s development. It is therefore, the sacred duty of parents, families, communities and the government to ensure that every child is kept safe from harm and given the opportunity to reach their full potential.” Even in Bhutan we had many cases related to child abuse like early marriage, child labour and violation of child rights. However those cases were left unheard and un-attendant by the concern stake holders due to unawareness of on UN CRC (Convention on the Rights of a Child) though Bhutan ratified in the year 1990.
Owing to the above statements, RENEW and UNICEF felt importance to educate concern stake holder on UN-CRC and therefore conducted workshop on 11th May, 2017 consisting of 20 Dzongkhag DAISAN Coordinators and Y-VIA coordinators from various schools. After the completion of the 4 days workshop, the participants were mandate to conduct Roll out Program on Child Protection and Youth Participation to the DAISAN and Y-YIA members in the school. Though the program was suppose to be held on end of June and August, 2017 but due to delayed Budget disbursement, our school could not conduct on proposed date. However at eleventh hour, we were blessed and able to conduct program in two phase; Phase I (4-5th November 2017) & Phase II (10- 11th, November, 2017) with 35 participants (Female; 16 & Male: 19).
Objectives of training:
i) Educate participants how to play a lead role in response and prevention of violence against children.
ii) To build a solid foundation that includes understanding at a conceptual level of child rights, child protection and children’s participation in violence.
iii) To help youth keep themselves safe, conduct themselves responsibly, seek support from adults in the environment, support each other, get organized, and work individually and collectively as key partners in an initiative to end violence against children.
iv) Make them able to design various programs that will help in making people understand the importance of child protection and rights of children.

Files Attached
Imagen de Scout Jamyang Tshultrim
from Bhutan, hace 1 año

Project Period

Started On
Saturday, November 4, 2017
Ended On
Saturday, November 11, 2017

Número de participantes

35

Horas de servicio

1120
Geolocation

Topics

Safe from Harm
Scouting and Humanitarian Action
Youth Engagement

SDG

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